How to use a saw blade

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Purchasing a high quality saw is not the end of the story. If you want optimum results you will also have to pay some attention towards the blades you are going to use.

Purchasing a high quality saw is not the end of the story. If you want optimum results you will also have to pay some attention towards the blades you are going to use. Apart from that regular maintenance will also prove to be a key between good enough and excellent. A smart woodworker isn’t all about the skill and talent but also about managing his precious tools and equipment and getting the most out of them with proper maintenance and timely repairs and replacements.

As far as the blades go, we can agree that Wilton saw blades are one of the highest quality sharp edges available on the market. They provide you with a great value for every dollar spent. Amana and DeWalt also offer a high quality selection of saw blades that can outperform many other brands. Choose your blades wisely. They should be right for the saw you're using and appropriate for the task you are going to attempt. Any deviations will result in less than stellar results.

So, one of the things that you need to know to get the maximum mileage out of your blade is its alignment. First, disengage the saw. Then raise the blade as high up as it allows you to. Now, align the straight edge of the blade on top the saw table or surface positioning it firmly against the blade plate and then center it across the plate's diameter. Measure the distance to the miter slot from from each end of the straight edge with an accurate tape measure. If two measurements you have just taken aren't identical then your blade isn't aligned. Check your manual for blade alignment instructions specific to your saw model.

When you have aligned the blade, you also need to recheck the saw fence. If fence alignment is off then your cuts won't be of high quality and you shouldn't settle for mediocrity. Moreover, misaligned rip fence also results in increased kickback making conditions relatively unsafe for you.

Whenever you use a blade, don't leave it as is. Clean it from wooden debris and other stuff. Otherwise it will yield worse results later on causing the blade to dull and deteriorate quickly and easily. And we know that dull blades aren't champions for making great cuts. If necessary, also resharpen your saw blades as it increases the blade's life and generates higher quality cuts in general.

But how would you know when it's time to resharpen? It's quite easy actually to identify a blade that can do with some resharpening. When a saw blade begins to tear, chip or burn the work piece starts to bind or when you have to put some additional oomph to put your work piece through the saw blade, you should know it is time.

If the saw blade has broken or damaged teeth, there is no coming back from that. Replace it immediately, otherwise it won't only give you less than satisfactory results but will also pose risks to your safety.